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What’s The Story Behind Formosa Oolong Tea?

While browsing the ESP Emporium website, you may have come across a special type of tea called Formosa oolong. What is Formosa oolong? And where does it come from? Today, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about Formosa oolong tea.

What is Formosa oolong?

Formosa oolong refers to any oolong tea that has been grown and produced in the country of Taiwan. It is also referred to as Taiwanese oolong. In years past, Taiwan was called Formosa (meaning ‘beautiful’), by Portuguese and Spanish sailors, which is why tea from the region is known as Formosa to this day.

Tea trees do not grow naturally in Taiwan. Although the history of Formosa tea is not 100% certain, it appears that tea trees were planted in Taiwan at the beginning of the 18th century. Evidence suggests that Chinese settlers brought tea plants over to Taiwan and planted them in the Taiwanese highlands.

Over the past 300 years, Taiwan has perfected tea production. Today, the country is known mostly for its oolong tea, which comes in a variety of blends.

Types of Formosa oolong tea

At ESP Emporium, we offer several types of Taiwanese oolong tea. Here are the blends that we have to offer:

Oolong Tea Lemon Basil: This blend is flavorful and serves as a perfect dessert to end a dinner. Some have also suggested using Oolong Tea Lemon Basil as an iced tea by mixing it with a pinch of lime and honey.

Flower of Asia (Mango) Oolong Tea: This blend is more complex and combines the flowery soft notes of the Lotus Oolong with the soft, spicy flavor that accompanies many Chinese teas. In short, it combines a pleasant mixture of different Asian flavors into one single blend.

Formosa Butterfly of Taiwan Oolong Tea: Creating this tea requires a strict adherence to quality standards. The blend can only be produced in the Taiwanese highlands, and fermentation must be stopped at the critical moment. During the fermentation process, the edges of the leaves darken while the center of the leaves remain green, giving this blend a pleasant sweetness and a fleshier drinking sensation. 

Formosa Oolong Tea: This is the classic Formosa Oolong Tea. Produced in the Taiwanese highlands, the leaves in this blend are fermented until about 50% wilted. During this process, growers use bamboo baskets to dry the leaves, which ultimately leads to a light-tasting tea with hints of flowery and spicy flavors.

Formosa Superior Fancy Oolong Tea: This is our finest quality Formosa oolong tea blend. Creating this blend requires a careful fermentation process. Once the blend is complete, it offers a noble taste that tea connoisseurs will appreciate. Formosa Superior Fancy Oolong Tea also provides an intense flowery bouquet and highly aromatic scents.

Ultimately, Formosa oolong tea tastes similar to oolong teas from nearby China. This makes sense, since the leaves were imported from that region in the first place. If you’re looking for a unique oolong flavor appropriate for any occasion, then we have a number of Formosa teas waiting for you to try.

Can Tea Ever Be Bad For Your Health?

Tea is widely regarded as one of the healthiest beverages one can drink. However, there are thousands of different types of tea on the market, and some of these tea blends are healthier than others. Today, we’re going to help you determine which tea blends are good for your health and which ones are bad.

Dieting teas – do they really work?

Everybody likes to look for an easy way to lose weight. Unfortunately, losing weight is rarely easy. Dieters tea come in a number of different flavors and varieties. Unfortunately, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued warnings about dieters teas. They often contain very few healthy ingredients and are packed with sugar or artificial sweeteners. In many cases, the only diet-specific ingredients included in dieters teas is caffeine, which temporary increases your metabolism and helps your body burn fat. Aside from caffeine, most of these dieters teas are fuelled by hype and feature minimal results.

Many dieters teas contain ingredients like senna, aloe, buckthorn, and other plant-derived laxatives. The FDA has issued warnings about these ingredients due to their lack of effectiveness.

Instant teas

Many instant teas contain very little actual tea at all. Instead, they are packed with preservatives, artificial sweeteners, sugar, and other unhealthy compounds. While not all instant teas are bad, many of them can be dangerous for your health.

Watch out for these tea ingredients

Both dieters teas and instant teas contain strange ingredients that can negatively affect your health. Specifically, the FDA has warned against taking teas that include:

-Ephedra (used for weight loss)

-Willow bark

-Germander

-Comfrey

-Lobelia

-Chaparral

Teas with those ingredients will often advertise that ingredient prominently. Unfortunately, these ingredients have unknown (and possibly harmful) effects on the body, so think twice before drinking these types of tea.

Herbal teas

‘Herbal tea’ is a broad term for any tea containing fruits, herbs, seeds, roots, and other natural ingredients. Because herbal teas have lower concentrations of antioxidants than green, white, black, and oolong teas, their health benefits can vary.

Here are some of the features that science has linked to herbal teas:

-Chamomile tea has antioxidants that can reduce diabetes and lower the risk of nerve and kidney damage. Some studies have also shown that it stunts the growth of cancer cells.

-Echinacea herbal tea has been suggested as a way to stave off colds. However, research on Echinacea herbal teas has not demonstrated a clear link as of yet.

-Hibiscus herbal teas: Recent studies have found that drinking three cups of hibiscus tea on a daily basis can lower blood pressure for those who already have modestly elevated blood pressure.

-Rooibos: Medical studies on rooibos herbal tea have been limited, although rooibos tea does contain flavonoids that could help fight cancer and other diseases.

The healthiest tea to drink?

In general, tea is one of the healthiest beverages in the world. Most tea is strictly derived from the Camellia sinensis plant with only a few different flavorings added to give it a unique twist. Camellia sinensis is an incredibly healthy plant that has been linked to health benefits like reduced cholesterol levels and weight loss.

Any black, white, green, or oolong tea is derived from the camellia sinensis plant, which means that it is geranlly quite healthy. Tea is also healthiest when used in a ‘loose’ blend, as more surface area is exposed to the surrounding water, increasing the nutrients and antioxidants that are released.

What Is The Healthiest Type Of Tea?

With so many different types of tea in the world, it can be difficult to find the perfect type of tea for you. What is the world’s healthiest tea - black, green, white, or herbal?

As you might know, black, green, and white tea all comes from the same plant – the Camellia sinensis plant. Depending on the processing techniques used, Camellia sinensis can turn into black, green, or white tea.

The tea blends made from the Camellia sinensis plant have been linked to several powerful health benefits. Here are a few of the health benefits of black, green, and white tea blends:

-Weight loss (due to caffeine and other ingredients)

-Increased levels of antioxidants that target free radicals

-Polyphenols like flavonoids and catechins benefit various areas of your body

Some tea blends have specific benefits that other tea blends do not have. For example, black tea has been said to protect lungs from smoke damage and reduce the risk of a stroke. Black tea has the highest caffeine content and forms the basis for flavored teas like chai. In many cases, tea that has health benefits will simply be classified as wellness tea.

The rich antioxidants in green tea have also been said to combat all sorts of different diseases, including neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Since green tea is not oxidized as much as black or white tea, it generally tastes more natural.

Meanwhile, white tea has powerful anticancer properties that make it healthier than virtually any other type of tea, and oolong tea has been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

One of the most popular types of tea in terms of health benefits is Pu-erh tea. Made from fermented and aged tea leaves, China Pu-erh tea has been linked to reduced weight gain and lower levels of LDL cholesterol.

Herbal tea, on the other hand, is made from various herbs and spices. Although science has yet to research many of the benefits of herbal tea, herbal tea drinkers have reported a number of different benefits, including everything from positive mood changes to anticancer properties.

The answer

In short, all tea blends made from Camellia sinensis features similar health benefits. However, the way the tea is packed can affect its healthiness as well.

Tea experts suggest that loose tea blends are healthier than those packed in bags. In addition to being more flavorful, loose tea blends tend to contain more antioxidants. After all, tea bags limit the surface area of the leaves that is exposed to the water. With loose tea blends, the entire leaf is exposed, which means more nutrients and flavor is drawn into the surrounding water.

What Is Assam Tea And Where Does It Come From?

Assam tea has been popular for hundreds of years. In fact, Assam is widely considered to be the world’s largest tea-growing region. Located in India, Assam is known for its popular blends of black, green, and white loose leaf teas, all of which feature a distinctly bright color and hints of fruit flavor.

Today, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about Assam tea, from its history to its flavor.

The history of Assam tea

Assam is a region in India. It is bordered by one of the country’s largest rivers, the Brahmaputra. Assam is located in the far eastern side of the country, bordering Burma and Bangladesh. The entire region is prone to flooding and experiences high-precipitation monsoon periods on an annual basis. More importantly, Assam’s unique climate and high-humidity have made it a veritable greenhouse for tea production.

Most tea producing countries of the world cannot actually grow tea natively. In almost all cases, tea crops are imported. However, Assam is one of only two regions in the world where tea plants grow natively (the other region is southern China, which is located nearby).

During the 1830s, adventurers from the United Kingdom began to venture into Assam. They discovered that locals were brewing flavorful, aromatic tea from the wild plants that grew on the hillside. These adventurers informed friends that there could be a market for the crop back in Britain. By the time the English East India Committee had colonized the region, Assam tea had already developed a reputation as being heathy, flavorful, and fragrant.

What makes Assam tea unique?

Assam tea is unique for a number of reasons. Assam tea is different than Darjeeling tea and Nilgiri tea because it is grown in the lowlands, not the highlands. Assam tea grows solely in the valley of the Brahmaputra River, in which the nutrient-rich clay provides ample fertilizer for tea crops.

Both Chinese and Assam teas are made from the camellia sinensis plant, although tea made in China is created from a slightly different strain of camellia sinensis. Assam tea is unique because of its glossy, dark green-colored eaves. The leaves of the Assam tea plant are also noticeably wider than Chinese tea plants.

In terms of health benefits, Assam tea is similar to Chinese teas and other blends. Assam tea has been linked to a reduced risk of heart attacks and strokes, and it has also been suggested to improve the immune system, relieve tension, and soothe nerves.

Assam tea is notorious for being strong, which can make it challenging for beginner tea drinkers. Many people choose to drink Assam tea with milk, which tends to complement its malty flavor. Because of these characteristics, Assam tea is usually marketed as breakfast tea around the world.

Conclusion

Because Assam produces tea naturally, the region has perfected tea cultivation over centuries. Today, tea drinkers can take a look at some of ESP Emporium’s best Assam tea blends under the black teas category.

Sri Lanka’s Tea Industry Could Pass $5 Billion In Exports By 2020

As one of the world’s largest tea producers, we’re used to seeing massive tea production numbers from Sri Lanka. However, Sri Lanka’s Daily News is reporting that the country’s tea industry could achieve $5 billion USD in exports by the year 2020.

Since the entire country’s GDP is worth approximately $50 billion, the fact that tea could be worth about 10% of that amount is notable. However, the important thing to realize about this news is that the country’s tea production would not necessarily increase, but the price of Ceylon tea would.

Sri Lanka’s Treasury Secretary stated last week that production of tea is only expected to increase by 2% to 3% by 2020. Prices, however, could be raised by as much as triple their current price. The statement was made at the 118th Annual General Meeting of the Colombo Tea Traders Association, held June 29th in Sri Lanka’s capital.

This means that, within the next 5 to 10 years, prices on Ceylon tea could raise dramatically. Ceylon tea is famous for its black tea blends, as well as its connection to various health benefits. Of course, many people find Ceylon tea to have a delicious taste as well.

  The Treasury Secretary also urged Sri Lankan tea manufacturers to work together to ‘brand’ the country’s tea in order to collectively increase its value throughout the world. While Ceylon tea is a name known by most tea drinkers throughout the world, it’s not quite on the level of other famous brands, like Earl Grey tea or Oolong.

Interestingly enough, many in Sri Lanka view tea as a “rich man’s drink.” Most of the country’s tea crops are exported to places all over the world or consumed at higher prices locally. Cheaper teas are often imported, allowing locals to profit off of the high prices paid for Ceylon tea around the world. 

What’s the secret behind Sri Lankan tea?

You might know Sri Lankan tea better as ‘Ceylon’ tea. Ceylon was the name of the country under British rule during the 19th century. The British had a profound influence on the country’s tea production, turning the sub-tropical island nation from a coffee-producing country to a tea-producing powerhouse in an incredibly short period of time.

Today, the investments made by the British government are clearly paying off. Not only does the country earn millions of dollars in tourist revenue due to its beautiful British colonial-style tea plantations (which are scattered throughout the countryside), but Sri Lanka also depends upon the infrastructure and administrative systems established by the British in order to manage the country’s tea resources.

Since Sri Lanka has only recently become stable after the end of its civil war, its tea industry – and the country as a whole – is expected to grow at a rapid pace over the coming years. Some even expect Sri Lanka’s GDP to grow to $100 million by 2020, which means that tea production would account for far less than 25% of that amount.

As of now, ESP Emporium’s Ceylon tea prices haven’t changed, and we don’t expect them to rise dramatically at any time in the near future. If the price of Ceylon tea does change by double or triple its current price at any time over the coming years, our ESP Emporium blog will be the first to let you know.