Can Tea Ever Be Bad For Your Health?

by Steven Popec 15. August 2012 13:50

Tea is widely regarded as one of the healthiest beverages one can drink. However, there are thousands of different types of tea on the market, and some of these tea blends are healthier than others. Today, we’re going to help you determine which tea blends are good for your health and which ones are bad.

Dieting teas – do they really work?

Everybody likes to look for an easy way to lose weight. Unfortunately, losing weight is rarely easy. Dieters tea come in a number of different flavors and varieties. Unfortunately, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued warnings about dieters teas. They often contain very few healthy ingredients and are packed with sugar or artificial sweeteners. In many cases, the only diet-specific ingredients included in dieters teas is caffeine, which temporary increases your metabolism and helps your body burn fat. Aside from caffeine, most of these dieters teas are fuelled by hype and feature minimal results.

Many dieters teas contain ingredients like senna, aloe, buckthorn, and other plant-derived laxatives. The FDA has issued warnings about these ingredients due to their lack of effectiveness.

Instant teas

Many instant teas contain very little actual tea at all. Instead, they are packed with preservatives, artificial sweeteners, sugar, and other unhealthy compounds. While not all instant teas are bad, many of them can be dangerous for your health.

Watch out for these tea ingredients

Both dieters teas and instant teas contain strange ingredients that can negatively affect your health. Specifically, the FDA has warned against taking teas that include:

-Ephedra (used for weight loss)

-Willow bark

-Germander

-Comfrey

-Lobelia

-Chaparral

Teas with those ingredients will often advertise that ingredient prominently. Unfortunately, these ingredients have unknown (and possibly harmful) effects on the body, so think twice before drinking these types of tea.

Herbal teas

‘Herbal tea’ is a broad term for any tea containing fruits, herbs, seeds, roots, and other natural ingredients. Because herbal teas have lower concentrations of antioxidants than green, white, black, and oolong teas, their health benefits can vary.

Here are some of the features that science has linked to herbal teas:

-Chamomile tea has antioxidants that can reduce diabetes and lower the risk of nerve and kidney damage. Some studies have also shown that it stunts the growth of cancer cells.

-Echinacea herbal tea has been suggested as a way to stave off colds. However, research on Echinacea herbal teas has not demonstrated a clear link as of yet.

-Hibiscus herbal teas: Recent studies have found that drinking three cups of hibiscus tea on a daily basis can lower blood pressure for those who already have modestly elevated blood pressure.

-Rooibos: Medical studies on rooibos herbal tea have been limited, although rooibos tea does contain flavonoids that could help fight cancer and other diseases.

The healthiest tea to drink?

In general, tea is one of the healthiest beverages in the world. Most tea is strictly derived from the Camellia sinensis plant with only a few different flavorings added to give it a unique twist. Camellia sinensis is an incredibly healthy plant that has been linked to health benefits like reduced cholesterol levels and weight loss.

Any black, white, green, or oolong tea is derived from the camellia sinensis plant, which means that it is geranlly quite healthy. Tea is also healthiest when used in a ‘loose’ blend, as more surface area is exposed to the surrounding water, increasing the nutrients and antioxidants that are released.

What Is The Healthiest Type Of Tea?

by Steven Popec 6. August 2012 15:42

With so many different types of tea in the world, it can be difficult to find the perfect type of tea for you. What is the world’s healthiest tea - black, green, white, or herbal?

As you might know, black, green, and white tea all comes from the same plant – the Camellia sinensis plant. Depending on the processing techniques used, Camellia sinensis can turn into black, green, or white tea.

The tea blends made from the Camellia sinensis plant have been linked to several powerful health benefits. Here are a few of the health benefits of black, green, and white tea blends:

-Weight loss (due to caffeine and other ingredients)

-Increased levels of antioxidants that target free radicals

-Polyphenols like flavonoids and catechins benefit various areas of your body

Some tea blends have specific benefits that other tea blends do not have. For example, black tea has been said to protect lungs from smoke damage and reduce the risk of a stroke. Black tea has the highest caffeine content and forms the basis for flavored teas like chai. In many cases, tea that has health benefits will simply be classified as wellness tea.

The rich antioxidants in green tea have also been said to combat all sorts of different diseases, including neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Since green tea is not oxidized as much as black or white tea, it generally tastes more natural.

Meanwhile, white tea has powerful anticancer properties that make it healthier than virtually any other type of tea, and oolong tea has been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

One of the most popular types of tea in terms of health benefits is Pu-erh tea. Made from fermented and aged tea leaves, China Pu-erh tea has been linked to reduced weight gain and lower levels of LDL cholesterol.

Herbal tea, on the other hand, is made from various herbs and spices. Although science has yet to research many of the benefits of herbal tea, herbal tea drinkers have reported a number of different benefits, including everything from positive mood changes to anticancer properties.

The answer

In short, all tea blends made from Camellia sinensis features similar health benefits. However, the way the tea is packed can affect its healthiness as well.

Tea experts suggest that loose tea blends are healthier than those packed in bags. In addition to being more flavorful, loose tea blends tend to contain more antioxidants. After all, tea bags limit the surface area of the leaves that is exposed to the water. With loose tea blends, the entire leaf is exposed, which means more nutrients and flavor is drawn into the surrounding water.

What Is Assam Tea And Where Does It Come From?

by Steven Popec 30. July 2012 12:00

Assam tea has been popular for hundreds of years. In fact, Assam is widely considered to be the world’s largest tea-growing region. Located in India, Assam is known for its popular blends of black, green, and white loose leaf teas, all of which feature a distinctly bright color and hints of fruit flavor.

Today, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about Assam tea, from its history to its flavor.

The history of Assam tea

Assam is a region in India. It is bordered by one of the country’s largest rivers, the Brahmaputra. Assam is located in the far eastern side of the country, bordering Burma and Bangladesh. The entire region is prone to flooding and experiences high-precipitation monsoon periods on an annual basis. More importantly, Assam’s unique climate and high-humidity have made it a veritable greenhouse for tea production.

Most tea producing countries of the world cannot actually grow tea natively. In almost all cases, tea crops are imported. However, Assam is one of only two regions in the world where tea plants grow natively (the other region is southern China, which is located nearby).

During the 1830s, adventurers from the United Kingdom began to venture into Assam. They discovered that locals were brewing flavorful, aromatic tea from the wild plants that grew on the hillside. These adventurers informed friends that there could be a market for the crop back in Britain. By the time the English East India Committee had colonized the region, Assam tea had already developed a reputation as being heathy, flavorful, and fragrant.

What makes Assam tea unique?

Assam tea is unique for a number of reasons. Assam tea is different than Darjeeling tea and Nilgiri tea because it is grown in the lowlands, not the highlands. Assam tea grows solely in the valley of the Brahmaputra River, in which the nutrient-rich clay provides ample fertilizer for tea crops.

Both Chinese and Assam teas are made from the camellia sinensis plant, although tea made in China is created from a slightly different strain of camellia sinensis. Assam tea is unique because of its glossy, dark green-colored eaves. The leaves of the Assam tea plant are also noticeably wider than Chinese tea plants.

In terms of health benefits, Assam tea is similar to Chinese teas and other blends. Assam tea has been linked to a reduced risk of heart attacks and strokes, and it has also been suggested to improve the immune system, relieve tension, and soothe nerves.

Assam tea is notorious for being strong, which can make it challenging for beginner tea drinkers. Many people choose to drink Assam tea with milk, which tends to complement its malty flavor. Because of these characteristics, Assam tea is usually marketed as breakfast tea around the world.

Conclusion

Because Assam produces tea naturally, the region has perfected tea cultivation over centuries. Today, tea drinkers can take a look at some of ESP Emporium’s best Assam tea blends under the black teas category.

Sri Lanka’s Tea Industry Could Pass $5 Billion In Exports By 2020

by Steven Popec 18. July 2012 11:43

As one of the world’s largest tea producers, we’re used to seeing massive tea production numbers from Sri Lanka. However, Sri Lanka’s Daily News is reporting that the country’s tea industry could achieve $5 billion USD in exports by the year 2020.

Since the entire country’s GDP is worth approximately $50 billion, the fact that tea could be worth about 10% of that amount is notable. However, the important thing to realize about this news is that the country’s tea production would not necessarily increase, but the price of Ceylon tea would.

Sri Lanka’s Treasury Secretary stated last week that production of tea is only expected to increase by 2% to 3% by 2020. Prices, however, could be raised by as much as triple their current price. The statement was made at the 118th Annual General Meeting of the Colombo Tea Traders Association, held June 29th in Sri Lanka’s capital.

This means that, within the next 5 to 10 years, prices on Ceylon tea could raise dramatically. Ceylon tea is famous for its black tea blends, as well as its connection to various health benefits. Of course, many people find Ceylon tea to have a delicious taste as well.

  The Treasury Secretary also urged Sri Lankan tea manufacturers to work together to ‘brand’ the country’s tea in order to collectively increase its value throughout the world. While Ceylon tea is a name known by most tea drinkers throughout the world, it’s not quite on the level of other famous brands, like Earl Grey tea or Oolong.

Interestingly enough, many in Sri Lanka view tea as a “rich man’s drink.” Most of the country’s tea crops are exported to places all over the world or consumed at higher prices locally. Cheaper teas are often imported, allowing locals to profit off of the high prices paid for Ceylon tea around the world. 

What’s the secret behind Sri Lankan tea?

You might know Sri Lankan tea better as ‘Ceylon’ tea. Ceylon was the name of the country under British rule during the 19th century. The British had a profound influence on the country’s tea production, turning the sub-tropical island nation from a coffee-producing country to a tea-producing powerhouse in an incredibly short period of time.

Today, the investments made by the British government are clearly paying off. Not only does the country earn millions of dollars in tourist revenue due to its beautiful British colonial-style tea plantations (which are scattered throughout the countryside), but Sri Lanka also depends upon the infrastructure and administrative systems established by the British in order to manage the country’s tea resources.

Since Sri Lanka has only recently become stable after the end of its civil war, its tea industry – and the country as a whole – is expected to grow at a rapid pace over the coming years. Some even expect Sri Lanka’s GDP to grow to $100 million by 2020, which means that tea production would account for far less than 25% of that amount.

As of now, ESP Emporium’s Ceylon tea prices haven’t changed, and we don’t expect them to rise dramatically at any time in the near future. If the price of Ceylon tea does change by double or triple its current price at any time over the coming years, our ESP Emporium blog will be the first to let you know.

What Are The Largest Tea Producing Countries In The World?

by Steven Popec 13. July 2012 12:07

Unlike many crops, tea is produced in only a few specialized locations around the world. Interestingly enough, tea leaves only grow naturally in southern China and eastern India, which means that the crops had to be imported around the world before tea production could begin.

Today, tea is grown primarily in Asia, although significant tea-producing regions have sprung up in South America and Africa. Today, we’re going to provide a brief overview of the world’s largest tea producing regions.

China

China is the world’s most prolific tea producing country by far. In 2010, it produced nearly 1.5 million tonnes of tea, beating its nearest competitor (India) by approximately 500,000. China has a wide variety of popular teas derived from the camellia sinensis plant.

India

India contains some of the world’s most famous tea-producing regions. The country’s most popular exports include Assam, Nilgiri, and Darjeeling tea, all of which are available in black, white, or oolong blends. Assam, located in the western part of India, is one of only two places in the world where tea grows naturally.

Kenya

Coming in at 3rd on this list is Kenya. Tea and coffee are the most popular agricultural exports in Kenya, and the industry has continued to grow at a rapid pace in recent years. Kenya produces a number of different varieties of black, green, white, and oolong tea. 

Sri Lanka

Tea has become popular in almost all regions colonized by the British. The British took over Sri Lanka in the 19th century, rapidly turning it into one of the largest tea producers on the planet. Today, the region’s blends of Ceylon teas are known throughout the world.

Turkey

Moving away from East Asia and Africa, Turkey is also one of the world’s most well-known tea-producing countries. Turkish tea often refers to ‘çay’ – a special blend of black tea. However, a special blend of white tea called ‘Rize tea’ is also popular. Both Rize tea and çay tea are produced around the Black Sea, which is a particularly good spot to grow tea due to its mild climate and high precipitation. Turkey also has an advantage in that its inhabitants don’t usually drink coffee or alcohol, making tea the country’s most popular beverage across virtually all demographics.

Vietnam

Vietnam is a close 5th behind Turkey in terms of tea production. Tea is one of the most popular drinks in Vietnam. Being located right next to southern China, tea has a rich and storied history in Vietnam, and it has been produced for thousands of years in one form or another. Vietnamese tea is produced in both the highland and lowland regions of the country. The most popular blends are jasmine tea, artichoke tea, and lotus tea.

Conclusion

Rounding out the list of the world’s top 5 tea producing countries are Iran, Indonesia, Argentina, and Japan at number 6, 7, 8, and 9 respectively. However, tea production can be found in varying amounts all over the world, from the United States to Brazil to Nepal, making it one of the world’s most popular beverages

The Benefits Of Drinking Fruit Blend Teas

by Steven Popec 10. July 2012 11:38

If you’re looking for tasty, aromatic tea, look no further than ESP Emporium’s wide selection of fruit tea blends. Our online store features everything from cranberry fruit teas to watermelon fruit teas and virtually everything in between!

Today, we’re going to tell you about the benefits of fruit tea. We’ll also talk about how to make fruit tea for yourself, as well as how to use fruit tea as a treatment for some of the world’s most dangerous diseases – like cancer and diabetes.

The most popular benefits of drinking fruit tea

Fruit tea has a number of unique and powerful benefits that make it popular among all types of people. Here are a few reasons why fruit tea is in such high demand around the world:

Sugary-drink replacement: Instead of having a sugary fruit drink, why not pick up a mug of fruit tea? Fruit tea tastes similar to fruit drinks although it has a fraction of the sugar content and almost no calories. Whether you’re on a diet or just trying to live a healthier lifestyle, fruit tea is an excellent cravings-quencher. 

High in Vitamin C: Just like fruit itself, most fruit teas contain exceptionally high levels of Vitamin C. Vitamin C benefits everything from our immune system to our eyes.

Easy to drink before bed: Fruit tea doesn’t contain caffeine, which means it can easily be consumed before bed without causing you to stay up all night shaking.

Strong and flavorful taste: Some tea blends do not feature a strong flavor. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing – indeed, many people prefer weakly-flavored teas. However, weakly flavored teas can dissuade beginner tea drinkers. Fortunately, fruit teas often contain strong flavors that are instantly noticeable. From the moment that fruit tea touches your tongue, its unique flavor is obvious. This makes it an ideal tea for those who are just trying tea for the first time – like children.

Energy boost: You probably feel a big energy boost after consuming a fruity drink. However, that energy boost is mostly the result of sugar consumption. And heavy sugar consumption almost always leads to a crash. Instead of sapping your energy, most fruit teas give you a clean, natural energy boost that can help you get through the day. And, since fruit teas don’t contain caffeine, they’re still safe to drink before bed.

What are fruit teas made out of?

Fruit tea manufacturers have become increasingly creative over the years. When it was first created, fruit tea mostly consisted of fruits like raspberries, oranges, and blueberries. Today, fruit teas can be found in flavors like cherry, apple, blackcurrant, and peach, and there are hundreds of different types of fruit tea blends that combine these flavors with popular herbs and spices.

Fruit tea can also be made at home quite easily. The most basic type of fruit tea blend involves brewing a cup of tea as you normally would before adding a splash of fruit juice to it. Or, make a pot of your favorite tea, add some fruit juice to it, then leave it in a pitcher in the fridge overnight for a refreshing summertime beverage.

Conclusion

How you drink your fruit tea is entirely up to you. Fruit tea comes in all shapes, sizes, blends, and flavors, which means that you can easily customize it according to what you like. Take a look at our wide selection of fruit tea blends today!

What Is White Tea? And How Does It Improve Your Health?

by Steven Popec 5. July 2012 08:25

White tea is a popular type of tea originated in southern China. It is only lightly oxidized, which distinguishes it from more heavily oxidized strains of Chinese teas like oolong and black tea.

White tea has become increasingly popular in recent years due to its rumored health benefits. Today, we’re going to teach you everything you need to know about white tea. We’ll also show you how white tea can help treat all sorts of serious conditions and diseases.

A basic guide to white tea

As far as teas go, white tea is a relatively new invention. It first came into use around two centuries ago. When white tea started to be shipped abroad, it was mistakenly labelled as black tea by people outside of China due to their similar manufacturing processes.

Eventually, people around the world started to appreciate the lightly sweetened flavor of white tea. The taste itself is not prominent, although there is a slightly malty flavor and a vague natural sweetness. Since white tea is neither bitter nor acidic, its weakened flavor makes it an ideal drink for anybody who’s experiencing tea for the first time. It also doesn’t have the strong herbal taste of green tea.

Despite what the name suggests, white tea is not white. Instead, it’s a pale green color. The name ‘white tea’ comes from the unopened leaf, which is covered in distinctive, silvery-white hairs. In China, buds are plucked before they open and then sun dried and lightly fired to make white teas like Silver needles.

White tea leaves have a light green color when dried. Since they don’t spend as much time oxidizing in sunlight, the leaves aren’t as withered as other Chinese teas.

You might notice some of the leaves have a fine, silvery fuzz on them, which comes from the hairs on the white tea plant. When drinking white tea, it’s not unusual to see these white threads floating on the surface of your drink.

Is white tea healthy for you?

Since white tea is derived from the same plant as black and green tea (the Camellia sinensis plant), it has similar health benefits. Here are just a few of the reasons why people love to drink white tea:

-Anti-inflammatory properties

-Reduces cholesterol

-Decreases blood pressure

-Boosts the immune system

-Reduces the effects of aging

Several official studies have been performed on the health benefits of white tea. A 1984 study at Pace University suggested that white tea has powerful anti-bacterial qualities that slow the spread of viruses and fungal growth. That study also concluded that white tea improves the strength of our teeth.

Further studies also reinforced the belief that white tea boosts the immune system. In 2009, a study at Kingston University proved the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of white tea. That study concluded by stating that white tea is a healthy way to treat conditions like arthritis and heart disease. The antioxidant properties also make it a great anti-aging drink.

Conclusion

Some people like the light, unobtrusive taste of white tea, while other people appreciate its health benefits. Check out ESP Emporium’s full selection of white tea.

South African Vending Machine Gives Away Roobios Tea For Tweets

by Steven Popec 2. July 2012 08:27

In one of the stranger news stories of the week, a unique vending machine has been installed in the South African city of Cape Town. While traditional vending machines exchange money for goods, this vending machine is different.

Named ‘Bev’, the tea vending machine gives away free samples of Roobios tea in exchange for a tweet. Specifically, people who use a certain hash tag on Twitter are rewarded with a small cup of tea.

After grabbing a cup of tea from ‘Bev’, fans can follow the vending machine on Twitter or like her fanpage on Facebook. 

While Twitter has been used in a number of unique and interesting ways, this is the first time the popular social network has been used to giveaway free tea samples via a vending machine.

Why is Rooibos tea so popular in South Africa?

There’s a reason that Bev hands out cups of Rooibos tea for free in Cape Town. Rooibos is native to the Western Cape province of South Africa. In fact, that is the only region of the world where Rooibos is grown.

Rooibos tea features a distinctive reddish-brown color. In Afrikaans, Rooibos means ‘redbush’, although the tea is not actually made from the redbush plant.

While rooibos tea is popular in South Africa, more and more people all over the world are starting to appreciate its health benefits. Rooibos tea contains powerful antioxidant properties with no adverse side effects, making it ideal for the treatment of allergies, digestive problems, and nervous tension. 

Do you use Twitter? Save money on your next tea order from ESP Emporium!

The company that made Bev isn’t the only tea company that wants to reward Twitter users. ESP Emporium currently has a promotion underway that gives a $5 rebate to anybody who follows us on Twitter. To enter this promotion, simply head to ESP Emporium's front page and click on the “Tea if for Twitter” link in the bottom footer.

A dialogue box will pop-up prompting you to follow us on Twitter. Then, enter your name in the text box underneath and we’ll send you a direct message with your coupon code. It’s that easy!

On Twitter, we keep you posted on the latest news going on in the world of tea. We also have special promotions that help you save money on our selection of loose leaf tea.

The bottom line

Whether you want a free cup of Rooibos tea from a vending machine or a full order of our   Organic Mango/Strawberry Rooibos Tea Blend, we can all agree that getting good deals on tea is a good thing.

To discover more about our selection of Rooibos tea, click here.

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The Ancient Chinese Origins Of Oolong Tea

by Steven Popec 28. June 2012 10:27

Like many types of loose leaf tea, oolong has been used for thousands of years. It was first cultivated in China thousands of years ago, and to this day, oolong tea plays an important role in Chinese culture. In fact, its name translated to English means ‘black dragon tea’.


Making oolong tea

Oolong tea has a complicated cultivation process. Before it can be used in tea, the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant must be placed in the sun and oxidized. During this process, the leaves wither, curl and twist to form the recognizable shape that we know today from popular blends like the Flower of Asia (Mango) Oolong Tea

The preparation process for oolong tea is known as gongfu tea-making, an ancient Chinese art that originated in the Fujian and Guangdong provinces of China. Its name literally translates to ‘making tea with efforts’, and the entire process of making oolong is very controlled and labor-intensive.

Ultimately, the process used to make oolong tea means that it tastes surprisingly similar to green tea and black tea. Since oolong tea ranges between 10% and 70% oxidation, it can be placed between green and black tea varieties on the oxidation scale. The tea itself has a dark brownish color.

Health benefits of oolong

As with many Chinese teas, oolong tea is rumored to hold a number of powerful health benefits. Here are just a few of the suspected benefits of drinking oolong tea:

Reduce cholesterol build-up: Many people believe that oolong tea reduces cholesterol build-up in the bloodstream, making it a very healthy drink for anybody who struggles with high blood pressure.

Eliminates digestive problems: Oolong tea has been shown to clear up all sorts of digestive problems. As a whole, it’s a very gentle drink for the digestive track to handle, making it a popular tea for people of all age groups.

Healthier bones: Some researchers have suggested that oolong tea can protect people from diseases like osteoporosis. Overall, oolong tea has been shown to promote stronger bones and prevent tooth decay.

Immune system booster: Like other types of Chinese tea, oolong is rumored to boost the functioning of the immune system, making our bodies stronger and helping prevent all sorts of diseases.

Weight loss: Many people drink oolong tea on a regular basis due to its weight loss properties. Along with all of the other benefits listed above, oolong tea has been rumored to increase metabolism and help reduce fat buildup throughout the body.

Overall, oolong tea has a number of ingredients that can benefit your health. Its antioxidants will repair the damage done by free radicals, for example, while the high potassium content improves brain functioning and aids your nervous system. Oolong tea has even been used to treat diabetes, as it often contains ingredients that help to regulate insulin levels in the body.

Conclusion

Overall, oolong tea is one of the healthiest types of tea on the planet. It is regularly drunk throughout China and the world due to its health benefits. Today, oolong tea is growing in popularity and is a healthy drink for people of all age levels and demographics.

A fabulous hot cup of green tea and also its particular marvels

by Steven Popec 7. August 2011 21:02

The latest medical analysis implies that aside from being revitalizing, tea provides substantial health advantages. Even though green tea is regarded as the advantageous, you actually cannot make a mistake with any kind of selection. A straightforward beverage includes a sophisticated brew connected with substances, a plethora of which will be flavonoids, a class of purely natural anti-oxidants. Flavonoids assist one's body eliminate free radicals which behave adversely with essential molecules making way for heart related illnesses and cancer.

Human population research has connected consumption of tea with a decrease chance for a variety of forms of cancer. Experts theorize that flavonoids, particularly in green tea can certainly destroy cancer cells. They already have been identified its capability in decreasing LDL levels plus encouraging blood vessels to relax.

This in turn potentially reduces blood pressure as well as minimizes stress on the heart. Research indicates that catechins of green tea alleviate the metabolic process and also increases thermogenesis. As a result it may be defensive against strokes and Parkinson's disease.

The mystery associated with green tea is based on the reality that it is actually loaded in EGCG polyphenol this is a potent anti-oxidant, the fact is two times as powerful as resveratrol of red wine in which restricts the side effects of cigarette smoking and also a unhealthy eating habits. Although green, oolong and black tea, all originate from the same leaves of the identical plant, camellia sinensis, they do not possess equivalent health-giving attributes. Black and oolong teas are prepared by fermenting the leaves, green tea is merely steamed just before packing and shipping.

In case you consume tea for wellbeing, hold the milk! Proteins connected with milk react with flavonoids, abating their particular wholesome effects in regards to their vasodilatory function and also the cancer preventing components aside from neutralizing their own fat-fighting potential. Plain tea served by pouring boiled drinking water over leaves provides all of the amazing benefits of its anti-oxidants. Decaffeinated, bottled and also ready-to-drink teas contain much less of these compounds. Boiling leaves in normal water is likewise not suggested since it leads to their tannin being introduced in to the liquor which could damage abdominal surfaces.

 

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