The Mystery Of Oolong

by Steven Popec 9. April 2010 12:25

Oolong

Chinese Wū long or Oolong is a type of tea located between green and black in the Chinese classification. In other words, Oolong is half-fermented tea. Oxidation ranges from 20% to 40%, and the most characteristic feature of this tea is that the leaves are fermented unevenly. Along the edges of the tea leaf fermentation can be quite astringent, almost like black tea with well pronounced reddish rim around a leaf but in the center of leaf fermentation, is very weak, close to green teas. As a result, Oolongs have a wonderful aroma and taste that combines the freshness of green tea and tartness of black tea.

Oolong combines the best qualities of both green and black teas. Some highly fermented Oolongs give a fairly dark brown-reddish infusion. However, such Oolongs constitute only a small share of the vast diversity of this type of tea. Basic and famous Oolongs have a gentle light yellowish or greenish tinge honey extract. By appearance of the infusion, they are closer to green teas and by taste - to black teas. A good Oolong is both refreshing and delicious with no trace of bitterness and stronger aroma than any green or black teas. Oolong is a well known type of Chinese tea used in ceremonies. A widely-used ceremonial method of brewing Oolongs in Taiwan and China is called Gongfu Cha. For a complete appreciation of the taste of this tea, tea pairing is recommended: tea bowl and snifter cup used to appreciate the tea's aroma. Tea poured into a snifter cup and a drinking bowl is placed upside down over the top of the snifter cup. Then the two are inverted so that the snifter cup is upside down in the drinking bowl. The final stage is when the snifter cup is lifted and the tea is released into the drinking bowl. After all this manipulations, tea drinkers can respectfully receive the aroma and then enjoy the taste.
 
There are two main types of Oolong that are grown and harvested in China and Taiwan, the mainland and island tea. The next classification is the type of traditional treatment and characteristics of climate and soil. Oolongs grow high in the mountains, shrouded in fog, on the poor stony soils. The quality of tea depends on the orientation of the slope, the number of fogs during the growth and professionalism of collectors, who manually collect and sort out the tea leaves in difficult mountain conditions.  
 
Oolong often resembles the form of twisted lumps consisting of strongly folded and compressed whole leaves. When touched, the lumps are elastic and dense. Fresh tea should be slightly shiny and have a strong fragrant. During the brewing process, the tea leaves unfold, expend and consume the entire volume of the teapot when steeped 2-3 times. Usually, Oolong brewed with water temperature of 176-194º F for 3-4 minutes. A teapot 150 ml takes about one heaped teaspoon. Expensive Oolongs can withstand multiple infusions up to 20-25 times. The fragrance of tea can vary from delicate peach tones to astringent walnut, with a corresponding color change of infusions darker with each subsequent brewing. There are varieties of oolong that color does not change and remains yellow-green, while others, originally given infusions of intense color give a pale infusion each subsequent brewing.

Oolong tea is the most diverse among Chinese teas in terms of taste and appearance . Oolong is tea-perfection conceived by Heaven and Earth. 

Open yourself to the wonderful world of tea

by Elena Popec 22. February 2010 21:28

People drink tea, to forget the hustle and bustle of the world.
                                                                                                     Tan Yen

Welcome to the world of unique, vibrant essence that forms an environment for communication to the world of green tea.

Apart from the fact that tea is simple to prepare and pleasant to taste, it is a unique plant which includes a huge amount of different substances that provide a favorable effect on the human body.

For some reason, only when we visit museums, we draw attention to the achievements of human race in various fields. Once inside the museum, we may explore the aircraft industry, we begin to admire the progress when standing  next to the first wooden airplane, then stroll over to find a super modern fighter jet, both man-made within the last one hundred years. In museums of fine art, we are surprised to learn about the enormous changes in the technique of writing that occurred in just a few centuries, at each stage giving the world priceless masterpieces. However, once among the remarkable and infinitely fragrant teas, we rarely think about the historic characters and events, some of which dates back to antiquity.

In ancient times, people discovered wild tea trees, the leaves are plucked from the trees were just chewed or boiled in water.  Century’s later people learned how to make pressed tea and then loose leaf tea. They gradually discovered many other variations throughout several millenniums, revealing all of its secret benefits. As a result, countless assortments of tea are on store shelves, readily available to all that desire this great treasure.

Despite the tremendous diversity of over 350 tea trees, each plant providing distinctive attributes within the glorious green leaves. Sky-high peaks, misty cliffs and green valleys only help these leaves to absorb a unique "spirit". The magical transformation of the collected tea leaves, from white to black, happens because of the improvements past down from ancient times.

We hope that while you are exploring our website and blog, you will assimilate many new and interesting things about the culture of tea, the types of tea brewing methods, the countless benefits of loose leaf tea and the secrets of making an exquisite cup of tea.

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