Ayurveda is a Doctrine Of Life, Health, Endurance, and Equilibrium Part 1

by Elena Popec 26. April 2010 13:05

In the last decade, Ayurveda concepts have become very common and fortunately, made people think again about their health. Therefore, more and more people are beginning to be interested in Ayurvedic teaching. Many do not know that Ayurveda is much more than a massage with oils or an art of relaxation. Ayurveda is an ancient doctrine which arose in the traditional Indian philosophy and was first described in ancient Indian writings, the Vedas. The term "Ayurveda" comes from Sanskrit words "Ayur" meaning "life" and "veda" - "knowledge", "doctrine". Thus, this concept can be translated as "the science of life." In the heart of yoga and meditation is also Vedic knowledge. Ayurveda has survived primarily because of the revival of Vedic master Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who opened the old knowledge to the modern world. For nearly twenty years of this vast topic of Ayurveda experts are engaged, as well as western doctors and scientists. The Ayurvedic doctrine is also described as an “integrated combination of the empirical doctrine of nature and philosophy” which focuses on the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects which are necessary to human health.

Submission of a man in Ayurveda

Ayurveda considers not only the human body, but the unity of body, mind and spirit in their relationship with the surrounding world and nature. Each person is different from each other, physically and mentally. With Ayurvedic extensive and integrated examination of nature, human beings in nature and all that surrounds it, Ayurveda is the doctrine of Medicine, which focuses on the concern for the preservation of health. While modern medicine considers mainly a disease and its symptoms, thus engaging the body, not spirit, or analyzes the impact on the human body. The starting point of Ayurveda is different, finding the right balance, or rather the balance of the three defining concepts of Ayurveda, so-called Doshas.

- Vata (Wind, Air, Pneuma)
- Pitta (Fire and Water, Chole)
- Kapha (Earth and Water, Phlegma)

The essence of the Ayurvedic doctrine is that the Doshas should be harmoniously balanced and this can be supported with the addtion of certain spices.

Basic principles of Ayurveda

Everyone has a balance of Vata, Pitta and Kapha, which is constantly changing. Mental state, time of the year and day continuously affect the individual balance and the balance of Vata, Pitta and Kapha. This equilibrium is not constant, it changes all the time. One might say that human health constantly updates; therefore a human being is a self-regulating system. However, the ability of the organism to self-regulation can be exhausted. For example, this may occur because of high level of irritation, stress, malnutrition, or due to the fact that in our sometimes too loud world, the human being loses the ability to listen to itself, enjoy the silence and cognize the quiet force in itself. Or, in other words, one may lose the ability to appreciate the moment without having a special occasion to celebrate.  Initially, Ayurveda strives to create an environment in which it will be possible to avoid disturbances. Therefore, the teaching of Ayurveda is the guidance for the construction of life: food, drink, sleep, choosing a partner, and more. These instructions are given to man to have three doshas (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) in equilibrium. Thus, Ayurveda is a system of healing, which aims to maintain health. The slightest disturbance can lead to illness and disease. Conversely, small corrections in the style of life entail improvements. And, of course, according to the teachings of Ayurveda, everything that exists in the world can be used as a medicine.

Stay tuned for part 2 as we will examine the three Doshas.

The Origins Of British Tea Traditions

by Elena Popec 6. April 2010 21:21

 

Loose Leaf Tea

The origin of tea traditions of England is obliged to one of the most beautiful women in the middle of XVII century. In 1662 Charles II married princess Catherine of Braganza from Portugal. The Portuguese had been the first Europeans that encountered tea, controlled the trade routes from Asia and drank this wonderful beverage. Chest with tea leaves, among other treasures was in bride’s dowry. According to tradition, the new queen’s passion for tea was appreciated in court, and soon became the most popular drink in the chambers of Buckingham Palace. Inventive British replaced the eastern bowls for cups and saucers and used tea spoons for sugar that also entered into vogue in the XVII century.

The British aristocracy recognized only the tea from the youngest and most succulent of the upper leaves, which are called "Orange Pekoe". "Orange" comes from the Dutch word meaning "gold, royal, belonging to the Dutch royal House of Orange-Nassau," and "Pekoe" - from the Chinese word "leaf". Because The Dutch East India Company played a central role in introducing tea to Europe, perhaps, they could have marketed the tea as "Orange" to propose a royal warrant. However, in modern classification of common tea leaf grades "Orange Pekoe" stands for "royal leaf".

The real revolution in the tea business actually began in 1837 with the ascension to the throne of the young Queen Victoria. China was unable to meet the increased demand in Europe and began to supply the market with product of insufficient quality. At the time, relations between Great Britain and China had escalated. In response to the British sanctions, China has imposed an embargo on trade with Britain. But the decisive Queen Victoria signed a decree of establishing the state tea company in the British colony - the North Indian province of Assam. Mayor of the Royal Guard, Robert Bruce and his brother Charles crossed breeded seeds smuggled out of China with local tea trees. Thus was launched a completely new variety with bright color and a strong astringent taste. In memory of those events, one of the types of English tea from Assam is named "Victorian".

By the middle of the XIX century, Britain became the largest tea supplier, capable of providing not only the needs of the empire, but also neighboring countries. The Assam black tea from the Indian colony of Great Britain, Russians merchants carried by caravans and sold in the capital's shops, "colonial goods" under the name "Indian tea". Taste of Assam for Russians still is the most familiar and traditional.

In XX century, the British voluntarily renounced the former "tea" colonies and focused the effort on improving the quality of tea blends. This act has reflected on a nation-wide British love for tea. Continuing the Victorian tradition, modern tea masters - tea testers - offer demanding connoisseurs of tea a wide variety of traditional and exotic flavors. English tea has long gone beyond the United Kingdom, and in many countries today, tea lovers enjoy impeccable taste, intelligence and respect for people.

 

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