The Green Tea Diet

by Elena Popec 15. July 2010 07:54

In this age of fad and crash diets, it can be difficult to find a way to lose weight that is effective and healthy. Adding green tea to your diet can be a healthy -and safe- way to make a beneficial lifestyle change and to help you in your weight loss adventures. Studies show that green tea can be an effective weight loss aid, and this type of tea has become more popular in recent times due to its tastiness and health benefits.

The nutrition of green tea
   
Green tea is loaded with nutrients and antioxidants, and polyphenols, and has been consumed for centuries in many countries. It has a plethora of health benefits. It has compounds that may fight cancer and heart disease, and it may even improve your metabolism. Improving your metabolism means that you will burn off the food that you consume, which will help you in your quest for a slimmer waistline.

Weight loss
   
Loose leaf green tea also helps to lower high cholesterol, and may even prevent  your cholesterol from ever getting too high. This is a wonderful benefit, especially for those who are trying to lose weight. Even by helping you to lose weight, this may help to get your cholesterol back down to a healthful level. A high cholesterol can lead to other health risks, including a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. There’s no need for diet pills and crash diets. Drinking loose leaf green tea every day can help you to lose weight and improve your overall health.

EGCG
   
Loose leaf green tea also contains a  certain type of polyphenol called epigallocatechin gallate, which is also referred to commonly as EGCG, and studies show that this compound may help to lessen the appetite and may also help to burn off fat. This is a far healthier way of suppressing the appetite. Diet pills may make the same types of claims of suppressing the appetite, but they can actually cause more damage than improvement. Actually, there are some “green tea diet pills” that now exist, as this drink truly does produce significant results.
   
Another reasons that loose leaf green tea work include, surprisingly, the caffeine content. Caffeine is known to have a small effect on suppressing the appetite, but research also supports that caffeine can help burn off fat. Caffeine may speed up thermogenesis, which is the process in the body that leads to burning off fat cells.
   
Drinking a few cups of loose leaf green tea may help you to see marked improvement in your weight loss journey.
   
Loose leaf green tea is said to be able to lower LDL cholesterol, the bad type of cholesterol. Some research also supports the idea that the EGCG in loose leaf green tea may help to regulate blood sugar levels, which would inhibit the absorption of carbohydrates.
   
It’s important to maintain a healthy lifestyle while on any type of diet. Drink lots of water and get lots of exercise. And while drinking green tea is beneficial to your health, it isn’t a cure all for everything.

Top 10 Reasons to Drink Loose Leaf Green Tea

by Elena Popec 14. June 2010 13:57

Is there even an argument of loose leaf over using tea bags? Loose leaf tea has been left in its natural state and the brewing of it brings out the flavor of the tea. It’s not really a contest over flavorless tea bags.

The Benefits

And green tea is delicious; it has a sweet, natural flavor. It can be paired with certain fruits or sometimes spices or nuts to complement its flavor. Beyond being completely delicious, green tea is a healthy choice.

Energy Boost

Green tea has just enough caffeine to give you energy, but doesn’t lead to the crash effect that coffee or espresso can give. The way caffeine is released from tea is in such a way that regulates how the caffeine is released, due to a compound that exists in the tea itself.

Stress Relief

Green tea also reduces stress. There are compounds that occur naturally in tea leaves that have a calming effect, which decreases the stress response in your body. Try brewing some green tea when you’re worried or stressed.

Weight Loss


Research has also shown that tea may help speed up the metabolism. This would help people who are trying to lose weight. Newer studies have found catechins in tea which help reduce fat in the abdomen. Catechins are found in weight loss supplements, but why take those when you can drink brewed, naturally occurring tea leaves?

Healthy Teeth

This tea has also been proven to fight off cavities. It reduces gingivitis and it reduces the bacteria in the mouth. The tea leaf has fluoride which occurs naturally, and is a substance that helps build up strength and health in teeth. Green tea also destroys the bacterium that causes strep throat.

Antioxidants

Green tea helps ward off many viruses and sicknesses. It has the most antioxidants among the four types of teas, and also has naturally occurring polyphenols, catechins, and many other naturally occurring compounds which increase immunity in the body.

Anti-inflammatory

It also helps reduce inflammation. Green tea has anti-inflammatory properties which are natural. It’s a better choice than taking even over the counter chemical compounds.

Lowers Cholesterol

Another benefit of green tea is that it can reduce cholesterol. Studies have shown that consuming green tea regularly can reduce levels of the “bad cholesterol” while increasing “good” cholesterol.

Helps Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease

And green tea also helps protect against Alzheimer’s disease, a form of dementia. Research shows that green tea can help improve memory related learning and have also been shown to help reverse mental deterioration.

Fights Cancer

Green tea may also protect against cancer, and it possibly kills off existing cancer as well. Research has shown that drinking between four and eight cups of green tea every day can really help when fighting off these diseases.

It’s Magic

Beyond all this, remember that green tea is also delicious. The most benefit of course comes from high quality loose leaf tea. These have less caffeine and more antioxidants. It doesn’t even seem like that difficult of a choice. The loose leaves can be brewed again to make three to six cups of tea. It’s affordable, delicious, and helps with everything from maintaining healthy weight and teeth to fighting off infections, preventing cancer, and even reversing the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Green tea truly seems like a magical elixir.

How to Find a Great Blend Tea

by Steven Popec 11. June 2010 07:34

The choices of flavors of teas can be overwhelming. There are literally thousands of different types and flavor pairings of teas. There are more types of teas in existence than a person could ever possibly try even in an entire lifetime. So, there are some things you should take into consideration when choosing a tea to taste.

The Basics
   
There are four main types of tea: black, oolong, white, and green. Among these there are many varied flavors, but most teas fall under one of these varieties. Another thing to consider is the quality of the tea. Tea that has been processed by hand has the best flavor, much better flavor than teas that have been processed by other means. The quality of the flavor is another thing to take into consideration. Natural flavorings are always the best choice.

Black Tea
   
Among the different types of teas, it’s important to know the main differences to begin trying out which ones you might like. Black tea is the most consumed worldwide but it has a strong flavor and the highest level of caffeine. It can handle strong flavors such as chocolate and strong fruits.

Green Tea
   
Green tea tastes sweet but has a very natural almost plant-like flavor. Most fruit flavors work well with green tea, as do herbs and spices. There are some flavors that could overpower the tea, however.

White Tea
   
White tea has a sweet flavor and aroma but its flavor can be overpowered by others very easily. Certain flower or fruit flavors do enhance the tea quite well. Melon and jasmine are examples which enhance the white tea flavor. Peaches, pears, and roses are also excellent to be paired with this type of tea.

Oolong Tea
   
Oolong tea has complex flavors, and it varies in flavor depending on how it is processed. It can range from being very similar to a black tea, to being very close to green tea. Peaches, apples, or oranges can be paired with this type of tea to enhance its flavor, but almonds or other types of nuts make good parings as well. Some spices and flowers can be paired with oolong tea as well.

The Health Benefits
   
There are many flavors of tea, but the health benefits of certain types of tea may alter your decision as well. Green tea and white tea have the most natural antioxidants of the other types of teas. When pairing these teas with healthy fruits full of antioxidants, you’ve brewed a drink exploding with health benefits. There are many fruits, spices, and nuts which have health benefits of their own that can be deliciously paired with white or green teas.

So How to Choose?
   
Learn what flavor teas you enjoy the most. Take some daring risks and try some flavor pairings you might not think would go well together. There are many different combinations of flavors of tea. Try out some different flavors and see which types of tea and which pairings you like the best. And by all means have some tea adventures and risk trying some bold new flavor pairings.

Four Main Varieties of Loose Tea

by Elena Popec 10. June 2010 10:11

There are thousands of varieties of tea throughout the world, and even among these the tea can be processed in a unique and different way. India’s Assam region harvests the most tea, and second in total world production is Sri Lanka. Among the varieties of tea are oolongs, assam, darjeeling, silver needle, wuyi, gyokuro, sencha, dragon well, white peony, and ceylon. There are thousands of types of teas, and the choices can be overwhelming. Most of these different types fall under four main types. These four main ones are ones which you are probably familiar with if you are a regular tea drinker: green, black, oolong, and white teas.

Do the Different Types of Teas Come from Different Plants?
   
There is only one type of plant that tea comes from, which may surprise someone who is new to the world of tea. All tea comes from the Camellia sinesis plant. There are some teas, called tisanes, which don’t come from Camellia sinesis. These include chamomile and herbal teas. But a newcomer might wonder how the single plant produces so many different types of teas.

If Teas All Come from the Same Plant, What Makes Them Different?
   
Anything can change the outcome of a tea. And there is a lot that affects the Camellia sinesis plant. Changes in the weather or different altitudes can impact how a tea turns out. Different parts of the world have different climates and different compounds of soil. These account for very varied types of teas that exist in the world today. A look at the four main types of tea:

Green Tea
   
Green tea is pretty well known these days and it offers many health benefits. It’s harvested in the spring, and after harvesting the oxidation process is stopped. Green tea is fermented a little longer. Some types are grown in the shade, and some are grown in sunshine. It’s a common variety of tea and can be found in most grocery stores, but there are certain types of this tea which are incredibly expensive. Some types of green tea can cost hundreds for a few ounces.

Black Tea
   
Black tea is oxidized more than the other three types of teas. The leaves are left to dry until they turn dark. It is also known to have health benefits as the other types. Black tea has much more caffeine than the other types of tea, and is consumed more world wide than the other types of tea.

Oolong Tea
   
Oolong, also called wu long, has a longer oxidation process, like black tea. Oolong tea varies in taste, but can have a woody or flowery flavor. Oolong is similar to green and black teas, and is a cross between the two.

White Tea
   
White tea is harvested in the spring, like green tea. It’s sweet in taste and has a delicious aroma. It is the least fermented type of tea and goes through a very simple process. It’s simply left out to be dried by the sun or in a room with specially controlled climate. It has health benefits that include its ability to fight cancer and fight off organisms that cause disease.

Black Tea May Lower Blood Sugar

by Steven Popec 9. June 2010 07:17

Many teas have health benefits, and black tea has many such benefits. This tea, which has been used for thousands of years in China, has many positive effects on the body, including lowering blood sugar.

Black Tea and Diabetes
   
Black tea is known to improve the health of the heart and to improve the immune system. Recent research also indicates that black tea can lower blood sugar. This would help people who suffer from diabetes. Research studies have found a substance in black tea that works in the same way that prescription medication which is used to control blood sugar levels work. These medications are used in patients with type 2 diabetes, and a substance that works in the same way is in black tea. This naturally occurring substance is found in higher levels in this type of tea than in others such as green tea.

How Does it Work?
   
The polysaccharides found in black tea help to inhibit an enzyme which changes starches to sugars. This decreases blood sugar levels, and this is the same process the prescription drugs use. Polysaccharides help to stop the absorption of sugar, and research has pointed out in the past that this might help people who have diabetes. Black tea also is shown to possibly help prevent cancer and other diseases.

So Can You Drink Black Tea in Place of an Oral Diabetic Medication?
   
No. Talk to your doctor before ever making a change in your treatment. These studies are not clear whether drinking the tea would be enough for treating diabetes. The study extracted the polysaccharides from the teas using chemical methods, which is not the way you brew tea at home.

Why is the Tea Black?
   
Traditional teas actually come from the same plant. The difference in color is due to the amount of processing. The black interacted with oxygen until the leaves darkened, in a process called oxidation. The process of the black variety only involves the tea leaves and oxygen. There’s no yeast or fermenting involved in this tea making process.

Black Tea has a Higher Level of Caffeine

   
This method does, however, leave much higher caffeine content in the tea. Black tea has a much higher level compared to other teas, including green and white teas. A cup of black tea has just about 50% less milligrams of caffeine in it than coffee has. A cup of black tea is used in many parts of the world instead of coffee in the mornings.

Where Can I Buy Black Tea?
   
Black teas are available at most grocery stores. Organic brands are becoming more readily available in stores, or they can be purchased online or at local health food stores. It may be available as a single tea packet, or in a blend. There are many different brands, and the choices can be a little overwhelming. Try a few different brands and types. Find the flavor you most enjoy. Brew the leaves in a pot-bellied teapot for the most delectable experience of the drink.
   
And drink up the deliciousness, and know that’s good for you too! The benefits of this drink are many, and it perhaps could lead, with more research and study, to another breakthrough for helping to lower blood sugar.

How Do They Make Decaf Tea, Anyway?

by Elena Popec 8. June 2010 11:22

Decaffeinated, which is also commonly referred to as decaf tea, is tea which has undergone a decaffeination process of one sort or another that has removed most of its caffeine. There are many different processes of decaffeinating tea. There are processes that are dangerous and have been made illegal, and ones that are completely safe without any health risks. The different processes in use have an impact on the tea, and can affect its flavor. There is also a process today that still uses a possible carcinogen, so it’s important to learn about the processes of decaffeination which are used on the tea you are buying.

Different decaffeination processes used on tea

Carbon Dioxide
   
Carbon dioxide or CO2 decaffeination is completely safe, and it’s extremely effective at removing caffeine. It’s also excellent at preserving the flavor. It’s the safest process that maintains most of the flavor. It uses highly compressed CO2 in gas form, which becomes a fluid under pressure. The only negative to this process is the cost; it’s expensive.

Ethyl Acetate
   
Ethyl acetate is a compound that occurs naturally. It is found in fruits and it does occur in tea leaves, though in very small amounts. This process is completely safe, but removes a little more of the flavor compared to other processes. However, the ethyl acetate process is inexpensive.

Methylene Chloride / Dichloromethane
   
Methylene chloride, or dichloromethane, is possibly carcinogenic and it is toxic in large concentrations. It is an effective process and does preserve the flavors, but it’s risky. This decaffeination process is legal in the United States and is regulated by the Food & Drug Administration. The low concentration left in decaf tea probably does not pose a large health risk, but there have been analyses of teas in the past which have had levels above the legal limit. It’s difficult to find out which teas come from companies which use this process, as they generally do not make it known due to the negative perception about this process.

Benzene

   
Benzene is a process that has been banned and has not been used for a long time. It is a dangerous carcinogenic chemical that can lead to many health problems and is not safe to be used in a decaffeination process.

Trichloroethylene

This is another chemical that has fortunately been banned and has been ceased to be used. It is unsafe for decaffeination, and was banned due to studies showing that it causes liver tumors in mice.

In Summary:
   
Carbon dioxide decaffeination is the most preferred method. It’s safe and preserves the flavor, though it’s a little more expensive. Ethyl acetate is safe, but doesn’t preserve as much of the flavor. But its decaffeination process is less expensive. Methylene chloride is legal, though it is a little more risky to use. This decaffeination process is regulated by the FDA. Other processes which were used in the past are trichloroethylene and benzene, which have been banned due to the health risks, and are no longer used.

Fruit Tea, The Essence Of All Fruits

by Steven Popec 6. March 2010 21:53

Fruit tea is a healthy, delicious and cheap alternative to all soft drinks and is available in many different flavors. Within recent decades, a fruit tea boom developed and now, most tea shops are carrying a large assortment of delicate fruit blends.  These teas have a great calming and restorative effect, contain no caffeine and can be consumed at any time of the day. The versatility of fruit tea blends took over a big population of consumers, including children and the elderly. Hot or Iced, fruit tea is a real treat!

Fruit Tea1

Typically, fruit teas are prepared on the basis of several components which include apple pieces, hibiscus blossoms and rose hips that characterize the body of the blend.  Two of the most popular award winning compositions of fruit teas, are based on citrus fruits and apple & cinnamon. All ingredients can be grouped in the following way: dried, freeze-dried, blossoms, peels, herbs, spices, powder and nuts.
 
What so special about a fruit tea? First of all, it should be noted that most fruits and leaves of fruit trees do not lose their beneficial properties in a dried form. Thus, fruit teas offer a great opportunity to get a complete set of vitamins and mineral substances in every cup of tea.  Freshly harvested, the raw fruits are frozen and freeze-dried in vacuum chambers. Hereby, the ice is directly turned into steam via a slow heating process and extracted from the cells. Form, color, size and consistency remain unchanged, and the opened cell structures allow a quick immersion in water. This process is especially favorable to all ingredients such as vitamins, minerals and aromas. No additives are used so that the outer appearance and a natural taste are optimally preserved. The fruit tastes are good as it was originally picked! Fruit tea blends are very refreshing and a good way to quench a thirst. Our recommendation is to start with Turkish Apple with Vitamin C. Pure freshness!

 

Exploring The Art Of Japanese Loose Leaf Green Tea

by Elena Popec 2. March 2010 12:54

Over the long centuries of isolation from the rest of the world, in Japan appeared amazing things: ikebana, bonsai, origami, sumo, kabuki, mange and much more. It is logical to assume that in respect of Japan, tea is not so simple either.

Green Tea

Green tea is very popular drink in the world today, but the Japanese consume tea in quite a peculiar way, starting with the production of special teas and ending with particular traditions of tea drinking. Japanese tea ceremonies (Sado or also known as Chanoyu) cannot be described in gastronomical terms. This is an art of contemplation and meditation, a way to achieve harmony with the world and cognize knowledge of the laws of the universe. Even leaving aside the complexity of a Japanese tea ceremony, we can tell you a lot about the kinds of traditional Japanese teas and its consumption.

The first thing that catches the eye, when studying the varieties of Japanese teas, is that they are all green and non-fermented. There are not that many types of Japanese traditional teas and they are all very unique. Their individual characteristics are not similar against each other, nor anything else in the world. The names of Japanese teas are fascinating: Matcha, Sencha, Genmaicha, Gyokuro, Hojicha, Bancha, Usucha, Kamairicha, Kabusecha, Tamaryokucha and Kukicha. Most of these products cannot be found on the shelves of tea shops outside of Japan. The most popular exception is Sencha and Bancha - the easiest tea to prepare with traditional green tea taste.

Sencha literally means “roasted tea”, a basic Japanese tea and the basis of which many other varieties of Japanese teas are developed. In fact, Sencha is a plain green tea that does not require special knowledge and skills to prepare. Most Japanese green teas are steamed at first to prevent oxidation, then rolled, shaped, dried and finally fired to preserve and add flavor. All lovers of green tea will admire its lightly grassy note. As any tea, Sencha could be a high quality and poor, we should not draw any conclusions about this tea when tasting Sencha of incomprehensible production. Good quality Sencha consists of a flat and long delicate tea leaves with distinctive fragrant of fresh green grass. Even high-graded Sencha contains a large amount of powder or tea dust. When brewed, Sencha gives a very bright infusion with a lively green color, traditionally served in transparent or white cups. The aroma and taste of Sencha are soft, both fresh and slightly sweet and velvety. Sencha tea infusion includes a large amounts of caffeine, vitamins C and B2. This tea invigorates the mind and body.

Preparing Sencha is a simple process, even thou the first attempt may fail, don’t be discouraged: warm teapot, put tea leaves in, cover with water remembering that water should not be boiling, and steep for a while ... However, it is impossible to give universal recommendations about the amount of dry tea leaves, water temperature and time of infusion, since the quality of tea and water are always different. Made with hard water tea is not as good because of its active substances that cannot dissolve fully. For green teas (all teas in general) there is a tip: the more delicate tea and softer water, the lower the water temperature should be and less time of infusion. Sencha tea leaves must not steep longer than 2-3 minutes. This means that the entire teapot tea should be poured into cups or into a separate container no later than in 3 minutes. If over steeped, the tea will be bitter, if under steeped the taste will be watery.  Sencha is the only Japanese tea that almost does not change the taste and aroma in the second and subsequent brewing. Other Japanese teas are inconceivable to brew a few times without losing the taste. The first of each new brewing is recommended to take one heaping tea spoon per 6oz serving of tea and infuse for 2 to 3 minutes. If the taste and aroma seem to be weak, hold the second brew a little longer, but next time increase the amount of tea. An indicator of properly brewed Sencha is bubbly foam. If not, that means that the water is too hot, cold, hard or the tea leaves are not the best quality.

Tea Gyokuro (also known as "precious dew" or "jade drops") is a higher grade expensive tea, which is cultivated in a special way. Gyokuro is different from Sencha because it grows under the shade for about two weeks prior to the harvesting period that aims to reduce amount of Catechin in leaves, therefore the bitterness in tea infusion. This fine tea is very rich in aromatic oils, vitamins, minerals, caffeine and other useful and pleasant elements. Splendid Gyokuro is also called "King of tea" and "Tea of genius" because it cheers up (raises) the spirit and stimulates the thinking. The taste and aroma of Gyokuro is similar to Sencha but with light almost imperceptible nuances. Color of dry tea leaves vary from bright green to golden-brown depending on the terrain and weather during the growth and harvest. Tea merchants will recommend a unique method of brewing for Gyokuro which differs from any other tea brewing techniques. Gyokuro tea leaves are typically steeped at low temperature 150 to 165 F for 1 to 2 minutes. Since the temperature of water is low, pre-heating the pot and cups in order to maintain the warmth of tea would be recommended as well. If the water used is too hot, it will destroy the magnificence of taste and aroma.

Matcha is a fine-powder with the consistency resembling talc green tea used in Japanese tea ceremonies and cooking. Matcha is the most difficult Japanese tea to prepare according to traditional techniques and requires specific skills. It was invented in China in the tenth century and was introduced to Japan only in the twelfth century. Being forgotten at home, powdered tea has become a cultural asset of Japan. Matcha is made from Tencha that has very similar cultivation process to Gyokuro. The process of covering tea bushes from direct sun light before harvesting enriches the tea leaves of amino acids and makes it sweeter. Gathered and processed tea lives with removed stems and veins undergo grinding procedure by millstones.  Matcha  is a premium quality and has a sweet taste with a deep flavor.

Matcha

During a Japanese tea ceremony, Matcha powder frothes up into a foam with bamboo whisk and a small amount of water. The advantage of this type of tea is the fact that all substances contained in tea leaves are delivered into the human body completely - in the form of an opaque beverage. Matcha is a concentrate of tea leafs. The taste of this tea is very fresh, but slightly bitter. Matcha can be combined with other types of tea adding freshness to taste and aroma. Lower quality grades of Matcha can be added to various dishes of rice, noodles and tempura to chocolate, ice-cream and traditional Japanese sweets.

Tamaryokucha is a high-quality Japanese green tea. To make it, tea leaves are steamed or fried. Tamaryokucha is rich in vitamins and contains little caffeine. This tea has a berry-like flavor with an almond aftertaste and citrus-grassy distinctive aroma.

Genmaicha is a combination of Sencha with roasted brown rice. This mixture gives a turbid light brown color of infusion and well pronounced rice flavor with hints of sunflower seeds and fish. Taste-wise, Genmaicha resembles soup, after the tea is drunk, you can eat the rice. This drink-dish is a great alternative to dinner or lunch for those who are on a diet. Japanese drink Genmaicha to subside the feeling of hunger without burdening the stomach. This tea contains a large amount of vitamin B1 and a small amount of caffeine.

Hojicha is a roasted tea that is set apart from other Japanese teas. This tea is made from Sencha which is roasted in a porcelain pot over charcoal at high temperature. Tea leaves of Hojicha tea ate brown and shiny with a dominating roasted flavor. Hojicha steeps by conventional infusion for less than a minute. Color of the infusions resembles weakly brewed black tea. Hojicha does not have subtle nuances of aroma and taste. This is a simple tea to quench the thirst or drink during the meal. Because of the process of roasting Hojicha, the amount of caffeine decreases, this tea can be served after the evening meal and/or before going to sleep.

Other Japanese green teas that are characterized as low quality Sencha are Bancha and Kukicha. These uncomplicated teas are made from big crude leaves, stems, stalks and twigs. These types of Japanese teas are collected at the end of the season and are considered as lower grade. Bancha and Kukicha are the simplest and cheapest of Japanese teas and are used for daily consumption of liquid for Macrobiotic Diet, the dietary regimen that is based primarily on grains and plants.  This macrobiotic way of eating is very popular in Japan. There are twenty two grades of Bancha. Kukicha can be added to juice for children’s consumption.

 

9 Tea Busting Myths, the truth is revealed

by Elena Popec 18. February 2010 21:29

Every morning begins about the same for millions of families in the world, with a refreshing cup of tea: black, green, white, herbal, fruit, flavored. We partake our favorite drink mostly out of habit rather than consciously.

Scientists have calculated that a person drinks at least 51oz of fluid in one day, one third of this is tea. In each country people drink it in their own way: one is with butter and salt, some like it with milk, others prefer it by making extraordinary "bouquet", adding in tea herbs, fruits or flowers. We have collected the most common myths about tea, so we can confirm or refute the controversial debate.


Myth #1. Tea has a tonic effect on the body, so it is better to drink in the morning.

True. Tea contains caffeine which has an activating effect on the cardiovascular system, so it should be drunk in the morning or afternoon. By the way, caffeine content in green tea is less than in black tea or coffee. Therefore, if you want to cheer up, do not drink gallons of coffee,  better brew a cup of aromatic and healthy green tea.

Myth #2. Tea with milk is harmful.


False. However, when milk is added, the chemical composition of tea is changing since the casein in milk binds the antioxidants. Tea becomes less tonic, and has less effect on blood vessels (the fact that the composition of tea includes vitamin P as well as other substances that strengthen the vascular wall). On another hand, tea with milk takes toxins out and works as a diuretic.

By the way, according to some narrations, the tradition of drinking tea with milk originated from the British. Due to the fact that the finest porcelain cups sometimes did not withstand boiling water and cracked. Therefore, the British began to dilute the tea with milk.


Myth #3. Loose leaf tea is better than tea bags.

True. Usually, contents of tea bags are known as fanning’s or dust, everything that is broken and crumbled. Tea bags are not necessarily cheaper than loose leaf tea, you pay for the packaging material and the process. Loose teas have more variants which can be brewed differently and it can be blended at your desired taste level. Tea bags, on the other hand, are pre-blended for a specific flavor. Loose teas can give you the purest of flavors for each variety, blended for your own preferences.  Tea brewed from tea bags is not harmful - just useless. There is simply no better alternative than loose tea,  it just tastes better. So, if you truly want to experience a heavenly cup of your favorite tea, then loose leaves are the way to go. Check out this great independent article titled, “For the love of tea!”. 


Myth #4. You cannot drink green or black tea in large quantities because it affects functions of the body.


Everything is good in moderation. Generally, there are no substances in tea that could harm the body. Three to four cups of tea per day will give you a total of 320 mg of polyphenols. People with kidney disorders, stomach ulcers, anxiety should not drink caffeinated tea. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should also avoid caffeinated drinks. There are a lot of healthy alternatives: Rooibos, Mate, Herbal blends, Fruit blends.


Myth #5. Herbal tea can be an assistant in the treatment of certain diseases.

True. Herbal tea cannot be used as medication but as an aid to help the drugs treatment is acceptable. However, herbs contain active substances that can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, people should take herbs with care, under the supervision of a practitioner knowledgeable in the field of botanical medicine. For therapeutic purposes or maintain immunity, herbal infusion should be brewed separately and should not be abused.


Myth #6. Coffee and tea have the same amount of caffeine.


No. Dry tea leaves contain more caffeine than coffee beans. However, in a single serving cup of prepared coffee contains significantly more caffeine than a cup of tea due to difference in amount used to prepare a cup of tea. Don’t forget that certain types of tea can undergo a second infusion that will have even less caffeine. According to eHow.com, you can see for yourself that black tea, which is considered to have the highest levels of caffeine, is 50% less than coffee.
 

Myth #7. Hibiscus or Karkade decreases blood pressure.


True. Drinking Hibiscus tea effectively lowers blood pressure and reduces high cholesterol levels. Hibiscus is a main component of many Fruit and Herbal tea blends. Teas that contains Hibiscus, is caffeine free and rich in Vitamin C, which has a pleasant fragrance and vibrant red color.


Myth #8. Tea should be strong.


Partly true. Of course, the stronger the tea, the stronger its components and the higher the tannin content. Excessive amount of tannin over time may prevent the body from absorbing calcium if your diet is low in this nutrient, but the health benefits of tea are much greater than probable issues.  How strong the tea should depend on one’s preferences and suggestions from the tea company.


Myth #9. Tea has an antiseptic effect.

True. Tea actually contains antiseptic substance, but the concentration of these substances is very low, and with serious illnesses, they may be useless. It is better to seek assistance from a doctor and use the tea as an aid.

Health Benefits of Tea

by Steven Popec 18. January 2010 14:35

Health Benefits

Were you aware that our nation drinks approximately 165 million cups of tea daily? Millions of people love the taste of tea, but many of us are not aware of the healing powers tea can actually give us.

Tea is not only delicious, it can also help prevent High Blood Pressure by controlling angiotensin, which eventually leads to high blood pressure, according to health experts.

Studies have shown that drinking tea can also provide us with protection against cancer, heart disease and it can also aide in preventing memory impairment conditions such as Alzheimer’s.

 

Healthy Antioxidants within Tea

Flavanoids generally found in vegetables and fruits; contain powerful antioxidants such as Vitamin C and E.  So, one cup of tea actually contains twice as many of these Flavanoids as one apple.

You often hear about the importance of consuming fruits and vegetables, but rarely are you encouraged to drink tea - maybe more of us should.

Consuming tea and its healthy antioxidants provides us with antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiallergenic benefits. 

Drinking tea also has the benefit of helping improve concentration thus improving performance. Concentration is improved due to the caffeine that is within tea. The caffeine makes you more alert and focused.

Tea is also a natural source of fluoride; therefore it helps to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Because tea contains this natural source of fluoride, it can help prevent certain gum diseases and tooth decay. 

 

The Power of Green Tea

The Chinese have been using the healing effects of Green Tea for centuries, 4,000 years in fact. Only in the past 20 years other parts of the world began to take notice of this herbal treatment for headaches, depression, and beyond.

In 1994, a study was conducted that revealed Green Tea could possibly reduce esophageal cancer risks by 60%. Numerous other studies have been performed as well to establish the health benefits of consuming Green Tea and to learn why the herb is so healthy.

Clinical studies conducted over the years have found that Green Tea, or the herbs that create Green Tea, contain powerful antioxidants. Many believe that it may help prevent cancer cell growth, but to also selectively eliminate cancer cells. This is especially amazing because the powerful herb does not attack the healthy cells around the cancer cells.

Green Tea can also be efficient in lowering the bad cholesterol, LDL, levels while boosting the good cholesterol, HDL, levels.  By doing this, Green Tea is improving the ratio of good to bad cholesterol and possibly helping to prevent the onset of heart disease.

The Chinese have shown us many healing teas, but Green Tea is by far the best healing tea that has been introduced to us. Because Green Tea leaves are steamed, they are able to hold on to their potent antioxidants.

Green Tea as well as Fruit Blends, Rooibos, Herb Blends and Ayurvedic are fairly inexpensive and is well worth the cost for all of the potential healing effects and preventative abilities it has.

 

Drink Black Tea for a Healthier You

Black Tea, although made from the same plant as white and green tea, is almost completely different. Black Tea, unlike Green Tea and White Tea, is processed and fully oxidized.  Although from the same plant, what happens to the tea leaves after picking is what sets the three apart.

Black tea does not hold as many health benefits as Green Tea, but it still has retains enough to make it a smart choice for drinking. One reason why it’s considered the smart choice is simply because most studies have been only conducted on green tea. This is because it is the most consumed tea in the world.

The antioxidants in Black Tea can help protect against free radicals damage that generally leads to disease. Some properties of Black Tea have been shown to slow the growth of cancer cells but not effecting the growth of healthy cells.

The fact that the properties in the tea have the ability to selectively target the cancer cells and not the healthy cells is truly amazing.

 

Drinking Tea May Slow Down the Aging Process

Drinking Black Tea has also been said to slow down the aging process. Look at the anti-aging lotions and serums on the market today and you will find that many contain tea leaf extracts. Black Tea also is known to help rev up metabolism and fat burning. This is even more so when used in conjunction with caffeine and exercise.

To lower your LDL, bad cholesterol, studies have shown that drinking Black Tea is beneficial in doing so as well as helpful in increasing your HDL, healthy cholesterol. Drinking tea can help balance the ration of good and bad cholesterol and help to ward of heart disease.

If you are diabetic, drinking tea can aid in lowering glucose levels. Lowering your glucose levels will also lower your risk of conditions brought on by diabetes such as cataracts. Start drinking tea today for a healthier you tomorrow!

 

Rooibos

Rooibos in Afrikaans is translated as “red bush”.  This has a very sweet taste and it is frequently used as a base tea to blend tea.  It is rich in antioxidants and it is caffeine free. Here are a few health benefits of Rooibos:

 

·         Contains a host of vitamins and minerals such as copper, potassium zinc, calcium, potassium and manganese.

·         It is anti-viral, anti-mutagenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic activity.

·         Helps infants with sleeping problems colic, stomach cramps or sleeping problems.

·         Is great for skin because it has zinc and alpha hydroxy acid. This can be applied to the skin in order to reduce eczema, sunburn and with acne.

·         Healthy for people suffering from kidney stones because it doesn’t contain oxalic acid.

Rooibos has traditional medicinal uses in South Africa and is often used to help combat against asthma and allergies. It is a great substitute for people who don’t use dairy products because it has magnesium, calcium and fluoride to help build strong bones and healthy teeth.

Quick Tip: To make a quenching blend of iced tea, add slices of apple & lemon and a touch of honey.  For hot tea, no need to add the usual sugar or sweeteners, simply use agave or honey.

 

 

Ayurvedic  

Ayurvedic is a historical holistic system of medicine from India. It offers great benefits of maintaining good health.  Here are a few benefits:

It relaxes the Mind

It has no known Side Effects

It improves the Quality of life

It relieves Tension 

Herbal Blend

For centuries, herbal blend (often referred to as tisanes) have been used in Eastern medicines. Today, it is highly regarded in Western medicine.  Herbal blend contains the following health benefits:

·         Dandelion leaf, has blood, liver and gastrointestinal cleansing properties.

·         Lemon Verben and Lemon balm have been used as a cold remedies because of its soothing effect.

·         Hibiscus has reduced hypertension studies have shown.

As you can see, Herbal Blend is a great addition to a healthy diet. 

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