Embrace Fall With Autumn Tea

The days are growing shorter and the nights are becoming cooler, and summer is coming to an end once again. Fortunately, autumn tea will help you usher in the next season with joy. It will have you embracing the cooler weather to come and have you pining for the golds, oranges and reds of the autumn season. Autumn Tea is the perfect drink to usher in the cooler weather. It’s easy to make and even easier to enjoy!

Harvest your ingredients:

-5 cups apple juice, unsweetened

-5 cups boiling water

-5 teaspoons loose leaf tea

-2 cups cranberry juice

-1/3 cup sugar or honey

-5 tbsp lemon juice

-1/4 tsp pumpkin pie spice

Start by placing the tea into your filter or strainer, then place that filter into a pitcher (make sure this pitcher is heatproof). Add the hot water and allow the tea to steep for approximately 5 minutes. Then, remove the tea leaves and/or strainer.

Add your apple juice, cranberry juice, sugar (or honey), lemon juice, and the pumpkin pie spice. Stir until the sugar or honey is fully dissolved. The Autumn tea is ready to be served and enjoyed!

This recipe should make about 3 quarts, which serves about 12 people. However, after you have a sip of this drink – 3 quarts might not seem like enough! The notes of spicy chai will warm you inside and out and delight your senses with a warm aroma and flavor. The mixture of the tea with the cranberry, pumpkin pie spice and lemon will make you feel sunny and happy even as the temperatures begin to drop.  Just cuddle up with your mug of Autumn tea and some friends and relax.

Our recipe uses a spicy chai black tea blend but you can use any black tea like a darjeeling with its aromatic and mild flavor which would blend well with the rest of the ingredient. Don’t get confused by the chai tea we used. Chai tea usually refers to masala chai which literally means mixed spice tea. In the tea our recipe uses, those mixed spices include aniseed, cinnamon, ginger and other special spices.

Or, you can use a fruit or herbal tea if you so desire! A berry blend or apple tea blend would be a welcome addition and make for a sweeter and fruitier beverage.

Do not fear or dread the oncoming change of seasons! Instead, embrace the short days and long nights and face them head on with a steaming cup of Autumn tea in your hand!

What Is The Best Way To Steep My Tea?

Experienced loose leaf tea drinkers know that the right brewing process is critical to making the perfect cup of tea. Steeping tea for too long can make it too bitter, while not steeping it for long enough can lead to a thin and watery taste.

Just how long should you steep tea in order to make the perfect cup? What kinds of water should you use? Steeping methods vary around the world, but there are some general rules to follow.

Before steeping

First, make sure you start steeping process of your loose tea with fresh cold water. Cold water has more oxygen in it, and oxygen helps draw out the flavor of tea. To preserve as much oxygen as possible, make sure you pour the water as soon as it starts to boil. Letting the water boil for too long will allow oxygen to escape.

Contrary to what many believe, you don’t have to boil water in order to make a perfect cup of tea. In fact, only black tea should be brewed with boiling water. If you’re brewing oolong tea, try to pour the water just before it reaches its boiling point. For green tea, pour the water when it reaches approximately 180F. At cooler temperatures, green tea tends to release more flavor and less bitterness.

Many tea experts recommend using filtered water to brew tea. Those who live in big cities often have chemicals in the water that can destroy the delicate flavors within complex tea blends. If you want your tea flavor to be as pure as possible, then it’s best to use filtered water.

During steeping

After pouring the heated water into the kettle, timing becomes very important. Different types of tea are steeped for different amounts of time.

Black tea: Steep for approximately 4 to 5 minutes

Oolong tea: Steep for about 2 to 3 minutes or 4 to 5 minutes, depending on stage of oxidation.

Green tea: Steep for about 2 to 3 minutes.

If you want your tea to be stronger, let it steep for closer to the maximum range using more tea leaves. Leaving it beyond that range will cause it to be overly bitter and not as tasty.

Many people believe that steeping their tea for longer will make it have a richer flavor. This is not always true. The best way to extract more flavor from your tea is to add more tea. In general, one heaping spoonful of tea per 6oz tea cup is enough. Add more if you want more flavor.

Other methods

The method we’ve listed above is the traditional method of brewing tea. However, it’s not the only method. Some people brew tea using a special Chinese ‘Gonfu’ method, while others used a Guywan system. Some of these methods require special equipment and unique blends of tea leaves. They lead to slightly unique tea flavors that complement different blends of tea.

Ultimately, you need to choose the tea steeping method that works for you. Some people like their tea flavored using a certain method, while others can’t tell the difference. Test out a few different methods to see which one you prefer most.

What Is The Healthiest Type Of Tea?

With so many different types of tea in the world, it can be difficult to find the perfect type of tea for you. What is the world’s healthiest tea - black, green, white, or herbal?

As you might know, black, green, and white tea all comes from the same plant – the Camellia sinensis plant. Depending on the processing techniques used, Camellia sinensis can turn into black, green, or white tea.

The tea blends made from the Camellia sinensis plant have been linked to several powerful health benefits. Here are a few of the health benefits of black, green, and white tea blends:

-Weight loss (due to caffeine and other ingredients)

-Increased levels of antioxidants that target free radicals

-Polyphenols like flavonoids and catechins benefit various areas of your body

Some tea blends have specific benefits that other tea blends do not have. For example, black tea has been said to protect lungs from smoke damage and reduce the risk of a stroke. Black tea has the highest caffeine content and forms the basis for flavored teas like chai. In many cases, tea that has health benefits will simply be classified as wellness tea.

The rich antioxidants in green tea have also been said to combat all sorts of different diseases, including neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Since green tea is not oxidized as much as black or white tea, it generally tastes more natural.

Meanwhile, white tea has powerful anticancer properties that make it healthier than virtually any other type of tea, and oolong tea has been linked to lower cholesterol levels.

One of the most popular types of tea in terms of health benefits is Pu-erh tea. Made from fermented and aged tea leaves, China Pu-erh tea has been linked to reduced weight gain and lower levels of LDL cholesterol.

Herbal tea, on the other hand, is made from various herbs and spices. Although science has yet to research many of the benefits of herbal tea, herbal tea drinkers have reported a number of different benefits, including everything from positive mood changes to anticancer properties.

The answer

In short, all tea blends made from Camellia sinensis features similar health benefits. However, the way the tea is packed can affect its healthiness as well.

Tea experts suggest that loose tea blends are healthier than those packed in bags. In addition to being more flavorful, loose tea blends tend to contain more antioxidants. After all, tea bags limit the surface area of the leaves that is exposed to the water. With loose tea blends, the entire leaf is exposed, which means more nutrients and flavor is drawn into the surrounding water.

Herbal Tea Blends - The different choices

Although it is most commonly referred to by the moniker “herbal tea blends”, the vast varieties of steeped herbal beverages that are enjoyed all over the world are not really teas at all.  In fact, tisanes (the more accurate term for herbal teas) don’t even come from the same plant as true teas.  Black, white, green, and oolong tea have the same source:  the camellia sinensis plant.  The distinctive appearance and taste of any type of true tea comes from how the leaves are prepared once they are harvested.  Altering the amount of time camellia sinensis leaves are given to dry and oxidize determines the style of tea that will result; the more time tea leaves spend in the curing process, the stronger and bolder they will be. 

While tisanes packaged, sold, and prepared in the same way as true teas, their origins could not be more different.  True teas are made exclusively from the leaves of the camellia sinensis plant.  Tisanes can have a variety of sources; the most common sources are the South American yerba mate plant, the South African rooibos bush, and any number of herb plants native to all parts of the world.  They can be made by drying different parts of the plants from which they come.  Tisanes are typically categorized by the part of the plant that is used to make them.  Many tea drinkers would be surprised to learn that a large number of the most common “teas” on the market today are actually tisanes:  mint and lemongrass (leaf tisanes), chamomile and lavender (flower tisanes), peach, raspberry and apple (fruit tisanes), ginger and Echinacea (root tisanes), cinnamon and black cherry (bark tisanes), and fennel and cardamom (seed or spice tisanes).  Unlike camellia sinensis, the plant sources of tisanes are used for much more than their leaves.  Because they come from such a wide range of plants and plant parts, tisanes offer many more options in flavor than true teas.  The wide variety of tisane flavors is often used to create flavored tea blends; true teas are mixed with tisanes to create varieties such as Chai.

Tisanes of all kinds have been steeped for centuries.  The ancient civilizations in Egypt and China left behind documented uses of tisanes for medicinal purposes as well as their general consumption for enjoyment.  Either in pure form or blended from various plant sources, tisanes were thought to have had a wealth of healthy properties that could ease anxiety and help to restore health.  Tisanes continue to be popular for both their delicious flavors and health benefits today.  They are naturally caffeine free (even decaffeinated true teas still contain trace amounts of caffeine), rich in antioxidants and vitamins, and are available in a broad array of flavors and blends.  No matter what your taste preferences are, you’re sure to find at least a few tisanes that satisfy your palate.  Tisane varieties are just as readily available, easy to prepare, and maybe for some even more tasty than true teas.

Tea Culture in China

Tea culture in China is completely unique in the way that it is prepared, consumed as well as presented. The fact of the matter is that tea is consumed on a regular basis in China regardless of if the occasion is formal or not. The Chinese view tea as a major part of their way of life as well as their history. Chinese tea culture has developed over centuries to the point where it is very refined. In today’s day and age there are many customs that are practiced in regard to tea drinking in China.

One of the biggest reasons why tea is consumed in China is as a sign of respect. It is a common practice for a young person to offer tea to an older person in Chinese society. This is done out of respect for the older generation. In a formal occasion a younger person should never expect an older person to pour them a cup of tea. For example, a mother may pour her children tea at home but when out in public the children would pour the tea for the mother. This ritual is well regarded in Chinese society and is always practiced in formal situations. Even though china is becoming more liberal, this is till practiced all across the country.

Another time when tea is served in China is at a family gathering. The tea is the center point of the gathering as it gives families a reason to get together. In china, parents rarely see their children after they grow up and move away. That said, emphasizing tea gives them a reason to get back together. On Sundays most family restaurants in china are crowded as there are families drinking tea together. The tea drinking is a reflection of the Chinese emphasis in regard to family values.

If you have done something wrong that you wish to apologize for it would also be appropriate to pour tea for that person. Tea is seen as a way to apologize for a serious offense. You would want to include tea if you are sincerely apologizing to a sibling or spouse for a misfortune. An example of this is if a child pours tea for the parent. The child is showing that they are regretful of their actions and that they wish to apologize. Without the use of tea the apology can be considered insincere by the person receiving it.

If you are getting married in China tea is used to express thanks on the day of the marriage. In a Chinese wedding the bride and the groom will actually kneel down before their parents and serve tea to them. This is the Chinese way of showing your parents how thankful you are for everything that they have done for you in the past. After the tea is served the bride and groom will say a few kind words and the parents will drink the tea. After the tea is consumed the parents will give the bride and groom a red envelope which symbolizes good luck in the future. In a later tea ceremony you may see the bride serving tea to the groom’s parents. This symbolizes that she has become part of the family. In addition, tea at weddings in china can be used as a way for people to introduce themselves. The bride and groom may serve tea to everyone in attendance in order to get to know them a little bit better. If a family member does not drink the tea that you serve it shows that they do not want you in the family. On the other hand, if they do drink the tea it shows the highest level of acceptance.

A final tea ritual performed in China is the folding of a napkin when drinking the tea. It is believed that folding the napkin is a way to keep bad energy away from the married couple. Since tea was regarded as a daily necessity it was important to do this as bad energy would interfere with it. The other daily necessities that the Chinese observe is firewood, oil, rice, soy sauce, salt, medicine and cuisine.

The use of tea in Chinese society is very important to all. It is consumed whenever and wherever it can be. The bottom line is that the Chinese rely on tea as a way of life- without it there would be a major loss in terms of tradition and culture that has been observed in China for many generations.