Loose Leaf Green Tea May Prevent Alzheimer's Disease

by Steven Popec 27. October 2010 16:23

The more research that is done, the more that loose leaf green tea truly seems like some type of miraculous panacea or elixir. Studies now show that an antioxidant that occurs in this type of tea may help to combat the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. This antioxidant may help to protect the brain and to potentially help ward off inimical effects of Alzheimer’s disease on cognition such as memory.

Alzheimer’s disease

    
Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia which causes memory loss, confusion, and trouble with cognitive processes such as learning. It is a disease of the brain that destroys brain cells. It interferes with functioning until the sufferer can no longer work or perform even simple daily tasks. It progressively worsens over time, slowly deteriorating the brain. It can be heartbreaking to watch loved ones suffering from this disease. There is no known, proven prevention or cure for dementia.

Green tea contains epigallocatechin gallate
    
A polyphenol called epigallocatechin gallate or EGCG has been shown in studies to help impede with the formation of certain proteins in the brain that are associated with nerve damage and memory loss. This may mean that they can reduce the effects of Alzheimer’s disease on memory and nerves. EGCG is an incredible catechin which has also been linked to fighting off cancer cells and reducing the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. More research is needed to study the effects EGCG has on dementia. Some studies have shown that it fights off harmful proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease. The absorption rate of this catechin in the human body is unknown, however.

Antioxidants in green tea
    
Loose leaf green tea contains antioxidants which may help to prevent certain enzymes associated with memory loss and other effects of Alzheimer’s disease, from forming. Certain compounds in green tea act as enzyme inhibitors for harmful enzymes that cause some of the effects of dementia. In this way, green tea works to protect the brain from this types of diseases and side effects.

Green tea is not enough

    
Though green tea helps to reduce memory loss, and inhibits certain enzymes that cause dementia, it is not enough to cure Alzheimer’s disease. It may prevent it, but further studies are needed to prove this. It is important to find out exactly what EGCG can do, and how much of it can be absorbed into the body at a time. More research is merited, but studies have yet to find a cure for dementia. It’s important to discuss treatment plans with your doctor.
    
It’s important to maintain a healthy diet and daily exercise. These are simple ways to improve your overall health and to fight off health risks. Drinking green tea won’t cure you of all ills and miraculously make healthful changes in your life, but it certainly can help you along the way. And though it may not be the cure for Alzheimer’s, drinking green tea can’t hurt you, even in large quantities. It’s worth drinking on a regular basis as it has many other benefits to your health and quality of life.

Loose Leaf Black Tea Benefits

by Elena Popec 27. May 2010 07:20

The beneficial qualities that tea brings to both mind and body have long been recognized by the vast majority of people around the world. However it’s always the green leaf variety that takes the plaudits with other varieties playing second fiddle at best, and often times ignored. We are constantly bombarded through the media and treated to information overload to the extraordinary attributes of the green tea variety. It is certainly then no surprise that it is to green tea that one’s thoughts first turn while looking for a healthy drink to refresh. Whilst it is certainly true that green tea does come packed with an incredible health-giving pedigree, the black tea variety, or ‘crimson’ as it is known in Chinese and languages influenced by Chinese, should most certainly not be ignored.

What's the Difference?

Black tea has as much to offer as the green leaf variety to those that choose to give it a try. A fact of which many people are not aware is that both black and green tea comes from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. The larger leaves from the Assamese plant are used for the black variety, with the smaller leaves from the Chinese plants being used for green and also white tea too. Whilst much has been said of the health giving qualities of green tea, those benefits can be said to be present in black tea also as they are essentially derived from the same source. This is despite its more intense processing and consequently lower levels of antioxidant. There also tends to be more caffeine in black tea and hence black tea can be considered more stimulating.

It is often of a better flavor too as green tea tends to lose its flavor after a year or so, whilst black leaf tea can retain the flavor for many years more. It is due to this attribute of black tea that it has long been used a commodity for trading, and black tea bricks were even used as a form of currency in the 19th century in countries such as Mongolia, Tibet and Siberia. TF-2 is a compound present in black tea. It is an antioxidant and as such is very helpful to the human body in the fight against cancer, diseases of the heart and other inflammatory ailments.

Black Tea Research

Studies carried out in Europe spanning a decade have shown that drinking in excess of 2 cups of black leaf tea a day can cut in half the incidence of heart problems in males. The best method by far with which to imbibe tea is in its loose form, and in the authors opinion the bagged variety should be kept firmly on the shelf. It’s not just a great flavor from which you will benefit with black tea but also the extraordinary health-giving benefits that it will bring to your body. And there are of course many brands from which to choose with varied tastes and flavors. All without exception compete admirably with their green leaf counterparts in health properties and arguably make a more enjoyable and flavorsome drink.

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